Minneapolis Finder Forum MN
RegisterSearchTutorialsMemberlistLog in
Reply to topic Page 1 of 1
Mark Jesperson Tries To Blow Off $350,000 Student Loans
Author Message
Reply with quote
Post Mark Jesperson Tries To Blow Off $350,000 Student Loans 
http://www.startribune.com/local/50806777.html?elr=KArksLckD8EQDUoaEyqyP4O:DW3ckUiD3aPc:_Yyc:aUac8HEaDiaMDCinchO7DU

Lawyer Mark Jesperson of Grand Marais tried to unload $350,000 in student loans via bankruptcy, but an appeals court denied his bid to lose the debts.

Screw this whining deadbeat who's "never made a voluntary payment" on any of his student loans.

Reply with quote
Post  
how much of the 350 is the actual loans, and how much is interest on interest on interest?

screw the whining shylocks and their usurous lending practices.

Smile

Reply with quote
Post  
If they're federally guaranteed and/or subsidized loans, I guess that would be us Confused

Reply with quote
Post  
There was recently an article in The New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/02/business/02lawyer.html?scp=1&sq=Lawyer%20student%20loans&st=cse) that described a similar case for an aspiring lawyer. The difference with his story was that the five state appellate judges denied his application to become a lawyer. Although I think $400,000 in student loan debt is excessive, he was not trying to unload his debt by filing bankruptcy. Also, the article brings up a good point that many other aspiring lawyers have been forgiven for such crimes as solicitation of minors for sex, efforts to deceive judges, and possession of cocaine so why could they be forgiven? Something to think about.

Reply with quote
Post  
It certainly is, and demonstrates the double standard involved when dealing with misconduct of people in positions of trust.

Here in Minnesota, if a police officer gets convicted for shoplifting a pack of gum, they lose their professional license forever. I'm fine with that. We need honest public officials. But doctors and lawyers who commit felonies are routinely allowed to retain or regain their licenses from state boards. They're also in positions of trust with the ability to exploit and abuse their professional relationships with clients and patients. I don't think it's too much to ask to hold them to the same standard considering the generous compensation they get for their expertise and expected professional integrity.

Reply with quote
Post  
"Martha Holler, a Sallie Mae spokeswoman, said that such threats would violate the company’s rules.

“The size of this account is extremely unusual, but not surprising given that the customer took out 32 loans to pursue undergraduate, law and masters of law studies and has not made a single monthly payment over his 26-year student loan history,” Ms. Holler said. “We are performing an extensive review of his extraordinary case, and if we identify any errors we will quickly rectify them.”

No, he didn't try to blow off his student loans with bankruptcy. He just never paid a dime on them.

Reading between the lines on both of these student loan situations, the average layman can probably reach the same conclusions as the learned judges and lawyers who ruled against both men.

The guys who took out these fortunes in student loans are nuts.

And unless they were foxy enough to sign them up for loans guaranteed by the Feds, the lenders are too. Do you think they'd lend YOU $350,000-400,000 backed by nothing but hot air?

Display posts from previous:
Reply to topic Page 1 of 1
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum