Minneapolis Finder Forum MN
RegisterSearchTutorialsMemberlistLog in
Reply to topic Page 1 of 1
CDC: Type 2 Diabetes Doubles
Author Message
Reply with quote
Post CDC: Type 2 Diabetes Doubles 
http://health.usnews.com/articles/health/healthday/2008/10/30/rate-of-diabetes-cases-doubles-in-10-years-cdc.html

The Center For Disease Control says the rate of Type 2 diabetes in the US has doubled in 10 years, with much of the increase in Southern states. The disease is strongly linked to obesity and inactivity. The traditional high fat Southern diet probably doesn't help much either.

Reply with quote
Post  
I'm not sure a high fat diet would be a terribly big piece of the pie here. Most of the fat one eats tends to go straight through one's system. It's a biological lose to take this stuff that's been converted to storage fat for energy later, spend energy converting it in to a usable form, just to convert it back to storage fat again.

The way I'm looking at it, one of the larger pieces is the complete replacement of water with soda. And where many aren't drinking soda, they're drinking liquor. Lots of sugars. Then another, possibly even larger piece is the fact that diabetes is being treated as if it were just an alternate life style rather than the epidemic it is.

Reply with quote
Post  
So you're saying that a high fat diet doesn't tend to make a person overweight? I'm assuming that the CDC findings refer to actual body weight/body fat as being a casual factor in Type 2 diabetes. I've got that nasty little problem, and I'm probably not more than 15-20 lbs over ideal weight. All the literature I've received from the MD strongly recommends a low fat diet with minimal meat and rich dairy products, and heavy emphasis on the fruits and veggies.

Certainly agree that steady consumption of soft drinks isn't healthy, in terms of calories and damage to the teeth as well, but I don't think that consumption of sugar alone is a direct contributor to diabetes.

Reply with quote
Post McDonalds Cuts The Cheese 
http://www.bloggingstocks.com/2008/10/30/mcdonalds-makes-plans-for-the-mcdouble/?icid=100214839x1212162395x1200794335

McDonalds is revamping its double cheeseburger by removing one slice of cheese, which it says will reduce the fat and calorie content of the sandwich. They will also save six cents per burger with the move.

Reply with quote
Post  
thrice wrote:
So you're saying that a high fat diet doesn't tend to make a person overweight? I'm assuming that the CDC findings refer to actual body weight/body fat as being a casual factor in Type 2 diabetes. I've got that nasty little problem, and I'm probably not more than 15-20 lbs over ideal weight. All the literature I've received from the MD strongly recommends a low fat diet with minimal meat and rich dairy products, and heavy emphasis on the fruits and veggies.

Certainly agree that steady consumption of soft drinks isn't healthy, in terms of calories and damage to the teeth as well, but I don't think that consumption of sugar alone is a direct contributor to diabetes.


Generally, no. The amount of fat usually has little to do with weight gain. It does contribute somewhat, because some amount of fat is processed in to your system. But the going theory is that whether you have a high fat diet or a low fat diet, the amount of fat that actually gets processed by your systems is relatively the same. Fat becomes a tool to help digest other things you eat, such as (IIRC) vitamin b.

Now I want to preempt this next bit by saying I'm NOT a big fan of the Atkins diet. But the one thing they did get right is that unused carbs are a major contributor to excess body fat. The way that they advertise that carbs are bad for you is utter nonsense, but excess carbs turning in to excess fat is correct.

So take in to account the sugary diet of the average American. With something like pop you get a double whammy. First you get the initial sugar shock that forces your pancreas to shoot out massive amounts of insulin to deal with the sugar. Then your body deals with the sugar and assuming you have a relatively relaxed lifestyle, the sugar carbs are going almost entirely to body fat.

Now how fat works in to diabetes I'm a little fuzzy on. From what I understand, your body needs to produce more insulin as your body fat (specifically your waist line) increases. Something about the fat absorbing insulin or some such. Sugary drinks end up contributing to the early demise of your pancreas in that it's forced to produce more insulin than normal to deal with the sheer amount of sugar pumped in to your body, then your body deals with it and says "I'll store this energy for later use," and your body fat increases.

It's the theory I run under. I watched my uncle (who generally ate rather decent, home cooked meals) drink diabetes in to his life. And in my life, whenever I want to lose a few pounds without exerting any major changes to my life style, I stop drinking soda. I still eat fast food, I still don't exercise, I just stop drinking soda.

Display posts from previous:
Reply to topic Page 1 of 1
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum